Our Blog

Primal Scream

P

The human body is wired with an organic alarm system

Our emotional alarms are triggered by different stimulus. Go to a rock concert or a Redskins game and you’ll experience a wide variety of alarm sounds. Conversely, sit in an emergency room or attend a funeral service for a young, tragic death and the alarm sounds are very different. Cultural influences impact these alarms. Attend a Middle Eastern funeral and the alarm volume is much louder. Watch a kid rip open that one Christmas present he has been obsessing over and a delirious alarm will pierce the ears. Some alarms sound as a result of just being happy.

I have a video my daughter sent me of my (then) three-year old granddaughter, Ella. Her mom silently videoed her as she was standing on her little step stool playing in the kitchen sink.Ella was singing her song, making it up as she went along; a song about how to wash an apple! It was a spontaneous solo concert; a child happily and loudly living in the moment.

Then there is the shivering,gut pain sound of the deepest grief that reflects the image depicted in Edvard Munch’s painting, “The Scream”. It is a sound revealing a vocal primal scream. I want to highlight three:

Primal Anger Scream

It is as if the entire world is screaming. We’ve all witnessed the “terrible two” temper tantrum when the toddler cannot control events. It is the child’s primal anger scream. Adult temper tantrums are just as real and intense. It is important to remember that feelings of anger a natural part of the human DNA. As one of the grief elements, its purpose is to lead a person to wholeness. I refer to the stages of grief as “elements”of grief because of the misleading idea that we pass through those temporary “stages”never having to encounter them again. The reality is that grief is more often cyclical than linear. It is not uncommon for anger to be mixed in with other feelings and emotions throughout the grieving process that can last for years. Anger is the warning light on the human dashboard, alerting the brain and dispensing adrenaline through the body, which can cloud thinking and lead to confrontation.The most effective way to disarm anger is to recognize and own it. Releasing anger in isolation with a primal scream is preferable to screaming at someone else.

Primal Pain Scream

I vividly remember getting that dreaded pastoral call on a warm September Saturday night. The voice on the phone said that Doug, a member of my congregation, had been killed in a car accident. By the time I arrived at his home, an emotional crowd had gathered.When Doug’s twelve-year old son, Douggie was told the tragic news, he bolted and ran, until some neighbors found him and walked him home. I sat on the floor of the half bath with my arm around his shaking, sweating body as he sobbed so hard, that he vomited. But it was the sound he made in between the sobs that haunted me; a primal scream of the deepest paint his kid had ever felt. This is the front end of grief, expressing an emotional hurt so devastating that the best we can do is to cry out with painful sounds. Instead of words to express his devastation, Douggie released an unrecognizable moan that morphed into a high-pitched wailing. I said nothing. I just held him, unable to hold back my tears. His wailing finally gave way to a limp, exhausted body.

Primal Condemnation Scream

Anger and pain, when managed in their context, are indicators of the need for care and healing. But,condemnation is an altogether different animal.

The primal condemnation scream reveals the ugly truth that we have defaulted to the ugliness of our self-absorbed predisposition. Condemnation is fueled by an overdose of self, jettisoned by anger, fear and insecurity. The condemnation scream often reveals a pent-up resentment. It is as if the bullet has been sitting in the emotional chamber for quite some time.Condemnation is the self-destructive disorder of our world held captive by a collective scream that drowns out constructive dialogue, destroys thoughtful expression and fatally wounds human dignity. It is the mob psychology weapon of choice becoming more lethal with each accusation. It is the head-throbbing noise that divides communities and families. And those in the funeral profession can find themselves in the middle of an out of control primal condemnation “rager”.

Here’s the point: The ability to recognize those alarms going off in our heads before the sounds come out is important. It means that we understand and embrace our grief. Repressing grief is the worst thing we can do. Resisting healthy grieving can result in depression and physical illness. It can also result in damaged relationships.

Funeral Directors and pastors are there to hear the primal scream and help the-grief stricken walk through that dark tunnel toward the light.

Greg Webber

Director,Community Care/Aftercare, Certified Celebrant

Logo Vertical (green)

6500 Iron Bridge Rd.

N. Chesterfield, VA 23234

804-275-7828 (office)

804-873-0441 (cell)

greg@morrissett.com

Funeral Mistakes to Avoid

Funeral homes in Midlothian, VAMaking arrangements for a loved one who has died can feel overwhelming. The process can take time and it can be stressful when dealing with grief and other emotions. If you want to have the best possible chance of honoring your loved one, there are some common mistakes that you should know about so that you can avoid them. Funeral homes in Midlothian, VA have some suggestions that can help you.

One of the most common mistakes people make is to rush through the process. Choosing a funeral home and planning the arrangements takes time. You should not rush through the decisions you have to make, including things like choosing a casket or an urn, or finding the best funeral home to provide you with the services you require. It is important to compare services and rates, and to ask for a full price list if you want to make sure you are hiring the right company.

The funeral home you choose is one of the most important decisions you make throughout this process, so you do want to do a lot of research about it before opting for it. Most funeral homes these days have websites and online presences that can make finding out about them much easier. Look for years of being in the field and read reviews that people have left about hiring them. People tend to forget this step, since they want to start the planning as soon as possible, but it can be a mistake.

Not having a budget in mind is another common mistake that can end up being costly. By doing a bit of research about the rates of the services you want for your loved one, you will be able to choose the right funeral home and cremation provider. Ask for a full price list to see if the rates are standard. By knowing what the services you want cost, you can plan your budget accordingly, and without surprises.

Ask lots of questions from the funeral home. If you have any concerns or questions about anything, including fees and the process, you should always ask. The right funeral home will be more than happy to answer any questions, so do not hesitate. You want to know exactly what you can expect and many times this can only happen if you ask.

All of these mistakes are very common and easy to avoid. There are great quality funeral homes that go out of their way to ensure you know how the entire process works and how you can have the smoothest time planning the arrangements. Midlothian, VA funeral homes are known for how willing they are to help you navigate the funeral industry. By turning to a company like Morrissett Funeral and Cremation Service, you can get started planning what your loved one wanted. Visit them at 6500 Iron Bridge Rd Richmond, VA 23234 or call them at (804) 275-7828 to learn more about the process and what mistakes to avoid.

Giving a Eulogy

cremations in Colonial Heights, VAA eulogy is an important part of any memorial or funeral service. It allows you to express what the person who is gone meant to you and it gives you the chance to say your goodbyes in a way that offers closure. Most people think that the hardest part is writing the eulogy, but for some, it can be the prospect of having to give it that frightens them. If this is a concern for you, providers of cremations in Colonial Heights, VA have some suggestions that can make it easier.

One of the most important things you can do to help yourself give a eulogy is to practice. Start by practicing alone so that you can get the rhythm of the words and then have someone listen to you. Not only will this help you feel more at ease with the entire process, but you will also be able to get vital comments. If you speak too quickly or too softly, getting feedback from someone you trust can be very helpful.

Prepare legible notecards. Some people try to memorize the eulogy and while you may not have a problem remembering it in your home when you practice, it is completely different when you are in front of lots of people who are grieving. Your own emotions can break your concentration and make it very difficult for you to remember what you wanted to say. Notecards can help with this, since they can offer guidance and a roadmap for the entire eulogy.

It is important not to rush through the eulogy. If you are someone who gets very nervous in front of other people, keep in mind that the tendency will be to rush through the eulogy. Record yourself if that is something that you are worried about or time yourself. It can be a great way of seeing if you are rushing or not.

Be sure to normalize your breathing as you give the eulogy. If you are someone who gets nervous easily or if your emotions are affecting you, you want to make sure that you are breathing normally. The tendency to breathe quickly and shallowly is common in situations like this, and it can make you lightheaded. Instead, be mindful of your breath.

Giving a eulogy can be much easier if you take the time to read about the process. Watch examples of people giving them at memorial services to get a sense of how long they should be and what the mood should be. Colonial Heights, VA cremation providers are always happy to help with this process and can show you great tips to make the eulogy less daunting. If you have been asked to give a eulogy for a loved one and you want to learn more, reach out to a funeral home like Morrissett Funeral and Cremation Service, located at 6500 Iron Bridge Rd Richmond, VA 23234. Give them a call at (804) 275-7828 to speak with experts about what you need to know.

Ghosts of Christmas Past

The holidays have passed, a new year has begun and yet I still find myself haunted by the ghosts of Christmas past. Every year as I get older I become increasingly aware of the passing of time and notice how things have changed, but for some reason this year was especially difficult.

I have experienced this feeling before. Grief. Emptiness. Longing for someone or something that wasn’t there. Wondering where the magic was hiding in the midst of all the supposed “sparkle” of the season. The first time was when I was about 5 years old and my parents had just separated. I remember looking around at all the presents, being surrounded by most of my loved ones, and yet feeling nothing. My father was not with us, and even though I wasn’t consciously aware of it I was missing him. I even asked my mother why I wasn’t happy, unable to understand that what I was partially missing was the way my family, and Christmas, used to be. At a very young age I was already experiencing grief.

My children experienced those pangs in a way after they learned that Santa Claus was a myth. Each of them seemed a bit forlorn during their first Christmas without the wonder of believing. They even mentioned that things felt different. To them it was as if they had lost a friend, or someone they loved had died. Not only that, change can be difficult for children and growing up is not always fun. So I tried my best to help them focus on what we did have rather than what was different. We found new ways to celebrate and find joy. Being surrounded by family that loves you and hearing their laughter can be magical, too. It doesn’t have to fly in on a sleigh pulled by reindeer. We are people of faith, so we focused even more on the true meaning of the season.

Change has come for me as well. Many family and friends who were once a central part of my life are central no longer. I grieve for the close relationships I once had with those who have moved far away. I still feel the pangs of hurt over some people who have made a deliberate decision to exclude me from their life. Most of all I desperately miss the loved ones who have passed away. Most years I have coped pretty well and found a balance between allowing myself space to grieve while also being happy. This year, however, the sad feelings caught me by surprise.

It happened while I was busy wrapping gifts and had placed an ornament in a small bag without checking the tag. My husband eventually brought the bag back to me, chuckling, and asked me if I had seen what it said: “To Mimi, Love Mark, Jenny, & Zachary.” He seemed to think the tag was cute, so he was shocked when I burst into tears. Loud, gulping sobs came out of my mouth in between ragged breaths. It was several minutes before I could even speak. I finally responded simply, “We need a different bag.” Then I cried some more, cradling the precious, shiny little gift bag.

That bag had been used during the last Christmas before everything changed for my extended family. I had bought a gift for my grandmother and she had opened it at my house and apparently left the empty bag. I was a new mother that year and yet somehow we had held a huge family gathering at my home. We were surrounded by love and laughter and it was wonderful, despite the fact that it was the first Christmas since my grandfather had died. Somehow that loss brought us closer together, and we clung more tightly to each other that year in the wake of the loss of our patriarch. Not long after that my grandmother died and events occurred that changed many of our relationships. I was left to grieve for not only my grandmother who had passed away, but also for family whom I now had to love from a distance.Family can be complicated sometimes, as can grief.
That grief can become even more difficult to bear when you lose the support of people who used to be an important part of your life.

In the years since, as I continue to age and my circumstances change, I often find myself longing for how things used to be. I also continue to miss those people who, for one reason or another, are gone. I would give anything for one more extended-family Christmas in my grandparents’ den, sitting by their tinsel-adorned tree and listening to “The Little Drummer Boy” on the record player. I never felt safer than when I was in that room. I want to talk to my grandmother and grandfather again, hear their voices tell the stories from when they were young, feel the warmth of their hugs. I want them to know my children.  Some years I find myself alone on the couch in the dark, save for the lights of our Christmas tree, and I cry just as bitterly as I did the year they died. Over ten years have passed and sometimes it doesn’t feel like it has gotten any easier. In many ways it feels like it has become more difficult. I miss it all so much that at times it feels like a physical pain. The feelings can be triggered without warning and by unexpected things, and the little gift bag was proof of that.

I have discovered that when those feelings come it is best not to fight it. I let the feelings and the tears flow, and it provides a bit of a release.  The tricky part is that I don’t dwell too long on the regret. If I spend too much time thinking about what I miss and who is gone I might be blinded from looking at the blessings right in front of me. I have a house full of people I love who love me back, and I still have a close extended family. At Christmas we take time to honor those we have lost and share stories, and we hold them close in our hearts.

Things change. Just because our lives aren’t the same as they used to be doesn’t mean they aren’t good, they’re just different. And yes, sometimes it can be really hard and incredibly sad. So sometimes I try instead to focus on gratitude and reach out to those I care about. That’s when I start to realize that I am truly blessed indeed and have many reasons to celebrate. That the ghosts of Christmas past and the people I have lost don’t have to haunt me. Instead they can be happy memories to decorate the halls of my heart and keep me in joyful company for years to come.

God bless us, everyone. 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Jennifer Roberts Bittner
Certified Celebrant/ Life Tribute Specialist for 

Morrissett Funeral and Cremation Service,                                            Serving families in the greater Richmond area since 1870

6500 Iron Bridge Rd.
N. Chesterfield, VA 23234
(804) 275-7828

Ask These Questions When Considering Cremation Services

Ameila, VA cremation

Deciding between traditional burial and cremation can be a complex decision, especially if you are making the decision for someone else. It is important to take into consideration all manner of variables, which is why it can be useful to ask a few questions about the process. Ameila, VA cremation providers recommend the ones below.

What is Your Budget?

Budget can impact everything, even if you have already decided on cremation. Some cremation options, like bio cremation, can be more expensive than a regular, direct cremation. Knowing what your budget is can also help you when deciding on whether to scatter the ashes or place them in a columbarium.

Do You Want to Be Present During the Cremation?

Many people choose to witness the cremation because they are concerned about the remains being confused for someone else’s. This never happens, however. Cremation providers follow very strict protocols to ensure that no mistakes of any sort occur. If you still want to witness the cremation, of course, you can do so.

Funeral or Memorial Service?

Deciding on this can actually help you if you are still not sure whether to have a cremation or a burial. People who want funeral services usually go for burial, since funerals require purchasing or at least renting a casket to have the body present during the ceremony. A memorial service is a bit different. You can have the ashes there in an urn or any other kind of container, or you may choose not to have them present at all.

Do You Want an Urn?

Urns are not required by the cremation provider. By law, they cannot force you to purchase one, either from them or from a third party. You can bring any container you like, or you can take the remains in the cardboard box that the crematorium or funeral home has to provide you with. If the company tries to force you to buy one, then it will be best to choose another provider.

What Options are There for the Remains?

It can be a really good idea to reach out to a cremation provider to see what options you have for the remains. You may want to scatter them or display them in your home. You can also choose to have them placed in a columbarium niche at a cemetery so that you can visit when you like. A lot of this will depend on the budget you have available.

These questions can make it much easier for you to decide on whether you want cremation services or not for your loved one. Do some research online, as well, to learn as much as you can about the process and about your options. If you still have questions, speak with an expert provider of cremations in Amelia, VA like Morrissett Funeral and Cremation Service. You can visit them at 6500 Iron Bridge Rd Richmond, VA 23234 or call them at (804) 275-7828 to learn more about your options.

Arranging a Cremation

Richmond, VA funeral homes

Cremations have become as common as traditional burials these days. There are a lot of reasons for this, including affordability, the speed of the service, and eco-friendliness. If your loved one requested cremation, it is always a good idea to know how to start making the arrangements. Richmond, VA funeral homes recommend following the steps below to start arranging the cremation your loved one deserves.  

The location you choose to provide the cremation services is probably the most important aspect to consider. You will want to take your time choosing, since there are lots of them in the area. You will want to choose a company that has years of experience providing quality funerary arrangements to people in the area, and that can offer the kind of cremation services that your loved one wanted. The right funeral home and cremation provider can make a huge difference, so do not just choose the first one you see.  

If your loved one did not leave instructions about a funeral or memorial service, you will need to decide yourself what the best option is. A funeral service is usually done before the cremation takes place, since the body is usually present. The memorial service, on the other hand, can be done with the urn and ashes present. Depending on personal preference as well as time logistics, one option may be better than the other.  

Get the death certificate next, since you will need it to start making all of the arrangements. Get a lot of copies and be sure that you can access more if you need them. After this, you will have to have the body transported to the funeral home or crematorium. Most funeral homes have services that can make this easy for you, so be sure to ask about rates.  

The cremation paperwork comes next. It is rather long and complex, so be sure that you have important paperwork and information with you. Since cremations cannot be undone, crematoriums and funeral homes are extra careful with the information they require to start the process. If you are not sure what you will be asked to provide, speak with them before you head to do the paperwork so that you can bring everything with you and avoid any delays or complications.  

The next step is to choose the urn or container you will use to transport the cremated remains. If you are planning on scattering the ashes, then you can bring any container, but if you are planning on displaying them, take the time to choose a nice option.  

These steps will help you plan a cremation service with ease so that you can mourn in peace. Ask help from cremation providers and funeral homes in Richmond, VA to ensure that there are no complications. Contact a business like Morrissett Funeral and Cremation Service, located at 6500 Iron Bridge Rd Richmond, VA 23234 to hear about their services and how you can get started planning a cremation. Give them a call at (804) 275-7828. 

Preparing for Unexpected Deaths

Matoaca, VA funeral homes

Preparing for a death is harrowing, but it can many times much more difficult to have an unexpected death in the family. There are ways to prepare for situations like these, even if you hope it never applies to you. Matoaca, VA funeral homes have some recommendations that can help you be ready to face any misfortune and loss that you may experience in the future.  

Life insurance is vital. Your spouse should have it, as should you. It is an added expense every month, but if your spouse dies, you will have the money you need to survive until you can get back on your feet. The same thing applies if you pass away. You definitely want to consider life insurance if you have children.  

Something that many people do not think about until it is too late is the need to know where important pieces of information are. Take the time to gather all of the financial information, social security numbers, bank information, and even passwords for emails, in one location. If something happens to a loved one unexpectedly, you will still have access to everything you need to be able to make arrangements. This is important if your spouse or loved one was the one that paid the bills or took care of the finances in the home.  

Set up a living trust and a will. You should not wait to do this, even if you are young. Wills are vital if the finances are complicated or if there may be disputes in the future with other relatives. If your spouse is incapacitated or is not able to make decisions, you will need to have the power to make them for them. This is a power that a living will can bestow, so be sure to set one up with an attorney. You want them to be legally done so that there are no issues in the future.  

Take the time to speak about funerary arrangements, even if it is a depressing subject. If anything should happen to your loved one, you want to make sure that you know what their wishes are for handling their remains. Be sure to also speak of things like organ donation and other medical concerns. Find out if your loved one has a particular funeral home or cemetery that they want to use or whether they want cremation or a burial. Do not leave these questions until it is too late.  

These steps can help you prepare even for an unexpected death. Take the time to set up a will and to get life insurance. If you do not know how to begin preparing, the best thing you can do is contact a funeral home in Matoaca, VA. They can guide you through the process and can even suggest attorneys and other professionals that you may need. Reach out to a company like Morrissett Funeral and Cremation Service. Visit them at 6500 Iron Bridge Rd Richmond, VA 23234 or give them a call right now at (804) 275-7828. 

What to Know About Burial Insurance

Bon Air, VA funeral home

For people who think ahead and who want to ensure that everything is set when they pass away, one option to consider is getting burial insurance. It is not something that is commonly spoken of, but it can be of great benefit for you and your family. If you are considering this option, funeral homes in Bon Air, VA can tell you all about what this service includes.

The first thing to know is what burial insurance is, since not many people have heard of it. This kind of insurance makes certain that your family and loved ones has the money they need to bury or cremate your remains. This can be especially important if you want to be buried, since the costs can be quite high when you include the cemetery plot, the casket, and other options. This kind of insurance will guarantee that your loved ones will not have to pay out of their own pockets for these services.

You can purchase burial insurance in many different price levels. You can choose a minimum of a grand of insurance, or you can go much higher if you would prefer a more elaborate funeral service. This makes burial insurance different than life insurance or even funeral insurance. Most of these have much higher minimums that you have to choose, which can make it difficult for some people to afford. Another difference that burial insurance offers is that everyone can apply for it, no matter what health issues you may have. This can take away serious stress from people who are ill and who still want to ensure their families are covered.

You need to find a great company to have the kind of burial insurance you want. You want to find a qualified agency that provides burial insurance with low minimums so that you can afford it even if you have a limited budget. Read up on the agency to see if previous clients have been satisfied with the services they offer. There are lots of sites online dedicated to helping people choose the right burial insurance company, so doing a bit of research is very helpful. Also be sure to read up on the kinds of services they offer, since different companies can have different ones.

It is always a good idea to compare rates and services to ensure that you are choosing the right company. Contact a few companies that offer burial insurance to learn about what they can offer. If you are not sure how to do this or where to begin, you should reach out to a Bon Air, VA funeral home. They have the right connections in the area and can point you in the direction your need when searching for burial insurance. Get started by contacting a funeral home like Morrissett Funeral and Cremation Service, located at 6500 Iron Bridge Rd Richmond, VA 23234. Ask them about their burial insurance recommendations by calling them right now at (804) 275-7828.

Christmas Without You

“I’ll have a Blue Christmas without you, I’ll be so blue just thinking about you.

Decorations of red on a green Christmas tree, won’t be the same dear if you’re not here with me.

And when those blue snowflakes start fallin’, that’s when those blue memories start callin’.

You’ll be doin’ all right, with your Christmas of white, but I’ll have a blue, blue, blue, blue Christmas.”                (Lyrics to “Blue Christmas”, sung by Elvis Presley)

The holidays can be hard after the loss of someone close. Nothing feels the same. The lights have lost their twinkle, the night seems even more dark and cold. So what can someone do if they find ourselves in that situation? What are some ways to cope or get through the extra emotion of the holiday season? Here are some insights from a few individuals who have experienced the death of a loved one and were gracious enough to share their thoughts about grief and the holidays.

More than one person shared that they find it comforting to engage in old traditions. It brings back warm memories of time spent together. Others find new ways to spend the holidays. However, if they decide “do” the holidays there is no one right way to cope with the change in the season. What matters most is finding a way to honor lost loved ones in a way that works for those involved, while also making the holidays special.

E.W. wrote: “The first Christmas after my father passed I couldn’t stand the idea of his chair in the family room being empty. I offered to bring my mom a small Christmas tree to put up next to his chair. We called it the ‘dad tree’ and decorated it with things that reminded us of him – lots of plaid and ornaments we had bought for him over the years. It helped a lot and made that empty chair not seem so empty. So that it was low stress as possible for my mom we took care of everything including watering it, decorating it, and taking it down at the end of Christmas.”

Others may choose not to celebrate at all. Erin, a mother who experienced the loss of her son Kreed, shared that one of the things she needed from others was “understanding.” Not only understanding as to why they would not want to celebrate the holidays after such a great loss, but also understanding of the fact that two years later they are still sad. As she wrote, “We still grieve as if it happened yesterday.”

If they do decide to celebrate, but in different or scaled-back fashion, she also hopes that others will respect that, because “We are celebrating in our way and a way we want to.”

However, if someone chooses to not participate in the holidays that does not mean you should ignore them or stop inviting them to events. They may choose to come, but even just receiving the invitation can be comforting. It’s nice to know you are not forgotten. So by all means still invite those who are grieving, let them know you care, and let them decide whether or not they want to attend. Also, it helps if you are understanding if your potential guests say yes but then cancel at the last minute. Sometimes they really do want to come but then at the last minute it can become too hard.

Kimberly’s family lost two beloved members within six months. The holidays were hard that year, but they made it a priority to gather their family together. They prayed, spent time with each other, and talked about their loved ones. She wrote, “My mom really wanted everyone together. It was hard on her but she was glad we did it, and so was everyone else. I guess the tip is to take people where they are at and respect their wishes.”

Remembering those who have passed is so important. It can help a grieving person to know that their loved one is remembered by others. Erin wrote that she hopes others will, “remember our boy at these times. It was his favorite time of year. Talking about him helps us, not hurts us. By not saying his name or his memories, it’s like he was erased. We love talking about him and remembering his antics this time of year.”

Another individual, Donna, wrote that her uncle died from Leukemia on Christmas Day at the young age of 36. He was her mother’s only brother among 5 siblings. She observed, “Christmas was hard for my mom and her family after that. But every year, my mom pulled it together to give her own 5 kids a happy holiday. And we never stopped talking about my uncle, and all the wonderful memories we have of him. We lost him in 1973, and he is still a big part of our family history because we keep the memory of this wonderful, loving man alive. My advice would be, don’t ever stop remembering the ones we lose, and treat each memory as a gift, for which we can always be grateful.”

Each memory truly is a gift. While all our families are different, with different situations, what’s similar is the love. Honoring and remembering that love is crucial, and helps us find strength and comfort. This holiday season may you be able to hold tight to your memories, so that they may they fill your heart and your days with light.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Jennifer Roberts Bittner
Certified Celebrant/ Life Tribute Specialist

Morrissett Funeral and Cremation Service
6500 Iron Bridge Rd.
N. Chesterfield, VA 23234
(804) 275-7828

Questions to Ask When Choosing Cremation Services

Bon Air, VA funeral home and cremations

Although cremations have become more common, there are people who still have concerns about the process or who might feel that it is not the best option for their loved one. If you are not sure whether you want your loved one cremated, asking for help from Bon Air, VA funeral home and cremations providers can be a good way to begin. Ask a few simple questions and you will be able to make the right decision.  

Is a Memorial Service Still a Possibility? 

One of the concerns that people have with cremation services is the fear of not being able to honor their loved one with a service of some kind. In fact, when you choose cremation, you will be able to plan the service much more carefully than you would with traditional burial. With a burial, you will have to rush to get the remains buried, but with a cremation, you can have the service after you have the cremated remains.  

What Options are Available? 

The options for a cremation can be varied. There are regular, or direct, cremations as well as other options like bio cremation. This option uses water instead of heat to break the body down and can be better for the environment. If you are not sure about which one to select, take the time to ask about each choice.  

What Urns are Necessary? 

Urns are not a requirement. A funeral home or cremation provider cannot make you purchase one. If you come to the cremation with any kind of box, that is perfectly fine. If you do decide on an urn, there can be lots of choices. Depending on your budget, the size of the person, the style, and the kind of use you want from it, you will be able to find choices that fit perfectly. There are even keepsake urns that can store bits of the ashes and that you can wear.  

How is Identification Maintained? 

Identification is maintained carefully with cremation. Unlike with a traditional burial, which you can undo if necessary, this is not an option with cremation services. That is why the companies take such careful measures to ensure that identification is done correctly and that all if the paperwork is in order. They are experts at this and they take serious care to avoid any issues.  

All of these questions are important when deciding if cremation is right for a loved one. Anything else that you are concerned about, you will also want to ask. The right funeral home and cremations provider in Bon Air, VA will be more than happy to offer their suggestions and to answer any questions you may have. You can easily get started making enquiries by contacting Morrissett Funeral and Cremation Service. They are located at 6500 Iron Bridge Rd Richmond, VA 23234, where you can visit in person, or you can give them a call at (804) 275-7828 to speak with the director today.